bjarvis: (Rearden Commerce)
I suppose I could come up with a more interesting subject line for this posting but I'm fresh out of ideas right now.

I've just finished writing up my self-assessment portion of my annual performance review for my current employer. I've only been with this firm for a year now and my manager has had his current role for only six months; it doesn't help that the company has been somewhat lax in the formal performance of reviews for most of its existence.

I got to set my own 2009 goals then assess how well I did in meeting them. Sounds like a sweet deal, n'est-ce pas?

It gets better, naturally. I'm an obsessive record keeper so I have a log book of all of my workday activities for the past 14 years. Reconstructing one's past 12 months of work is pretty easy with this level of detail. And since my prior employer was equally obsessive about having very detailed evaluations, I have several years of HR-approved verbiage at my fingertips from which I can cull key phrases, bons mots and more.

The first draft has been emailed to my boss for his review & evaluation. I have since thought of a few additional points I could add to reinforce my position but that's probably overkill. By intent, I set my own performance level to be largely satisfactory (as opposed to superior): there's no money for raises or bonuses so there's no advantage to blowing one's horn too hard at this point. I also don't want to raise the bar too high lest my 2010 performance look mediocre by comparison.

In other news, I've purchased my air fare and booked my hotel & rental car for a visit to corporate headquarters in San Francisco. I'll be in the bay area for March 15-22. There's a list of people I'm looking forward to visiting again but I need to sort out my work schedule in detail before I make too many commitments. It doesn't help either that I'll be the on-call engineer that week. More news as it develops.
bjarvis: (Rearden Commerce)
I suppose I could come up with a more interesting subject line for this posting but I'm fresh out of ideas right now.

I've just finished writing up my self-assessment portion of my annual performance review for my current employer. I've only been with this firm for a year now and my manager has had his current role for only six months; it doesn't help that the company has been somewhat lax in the formal performance of reviews for most of its existence.

I got to set my own 2009 goals then assess how well I did in meeting them. Sounds like a sweet deal, n'est-ce pas?

It gets better, naturally. I'm an obsessive record keeper so I have a log book of all of my workday activities for the past 14 years. Reconstructing one's past 12 months of work is pretty easy with this level of detail. And since my prior employer was equally obsessive about having very detailed evaluations, I have several years of HR-approved verbiage at my fingertips from which I can cull key phrases, bons mots and more.

The first draft has been emailed to my boss for his review & evaluation. I have since thought of a few additional points I could add to reinforce my position but that's probably overkill. By intent, I set my own performance level to be largely satisfactory (as opposed to superior): there's no money for raises or bonuses so there's no advantage to blowing one's horn too hard at this point. I also don't want to raise the bar too high lest my 2010 performance look mediocre by comparison.

In other news, I've purchased my air fare and booked my hotel & rental car for a visit to corporate headquarters in San Francisco. I'll be in the bay area for March 15-22. There's a list of people I'm looking forward to visiting again but I need to sort out my work schedule in detail before I make too many commitments. It doesn't help either that I'll be the on-call engineer that week. More news as it develops.

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